Goats are great. They are generally calm, but they like to have fun if they have their space to jump and the amount of grass to graze. Although sometimes, its playful and competitive nature shows and those horns they have can cause damage to other goats and also to humans.

Although the best thing to do is train your goat while it is young to avoid aggressive behaviors when growing up, this solution with pool churros is adorable, fun, and also temporary. We don’t know for sure how long they hold on the horns before they break or chew them, but if they serve to prevent further damage, why not?

Aggressive behavior can be anything: from stubbornness and disobedience, disrespect to owners, orbiting, kicking, and pushing things with their horns. But they don’t always do it on purpose, and these pool churros can protect children who play with them, or perhaps when they’re being milked.

And not only pool churros: people have improvised with all kinds of things to protect themselves from the onslaught: from buckets and tape to tennis balls on the tips.

Whichever method you choose, remember that educating them is always the best option, even if they are famous for their stubbornness and mischief. It may take time and patience, but it will be a lot of fun to see them walking around with their colorful churros on their horns.

According to the people at Dummies, you can teach almost anything to a goat with a clicker, just like you would a dog. “You need a clicker, a mechanical device that clicks, and goat treats, which can be cereal flakes or peanuts. Combining the click with the treats, the goat feels reinforced in doing things well, when she connects both things: you click and give her a treat, between 20 or 30 times. She begins to associate the click with food and in the end responds only to the click and you don’t have to give her a treat constantly.

After teaching her this you can start training her. You give her an order (“Come here” for example) and you click when the goat does what you wanted it to do, and you give her a treat when her task is done.

Of course, the goat will not follow your orders without practicing. If he doesn’t obey you or does something else, you can say “wrong” or another word, and try again. Always click when she does what is expected of her and give her a treat. If you give the treat first, you risk the goat eating and not paying attention to the click.

What do you think? Do you have a goat, or would you think you had one? Can you imagine teaching obedience to a goat? Tell us what you think in the comments.

Here you can see a goat in action with the churros on:

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